Types of Releases

There are several different types of releases. To find the one you need ask yourself why and when you should write one. The reason for writing releases is determined by the type of organization you write for and what your aims are. A release is just one of many ways a company uses to get media attention.

You write releases when you have news. You should write a news release when your news fall into the following categories – announcements, created news, spot news, response situations, features, bad news and special matters.

Announcement Releases – These releases includes the marketing of a new product, the opening of a new plant and a new company policy.

Created News Releases – Often, a mere announcement isn’t enough to attract the desired media attention. In this case, a company may try to make the release juicier by making sure something newsworthy is happening. The company might bring a celebrity to a concert or a well-known speaker to a company function.

Spot News Releases – Announcement releases are sometimes about things that happened without warning. An explosion can occur in a munitions factory, an airplane can be hijacked. Such occurrences are spot news, and when they happen a news release is in order. You have to fill in the blanks as they become available, issue news bulletins and follow with a release with as much information as you can provide. A spot news release usually has to be followed by a second release explaining how the initial events were resolved.

Response Releases – Often news about a company is delivered by sources other than the public relations department. A consumer group may issue a report critical of a company. When this happens reporters call for responses. Companies with good public relations organizations anticipate these calls and have position papers for reference and response releases ready.

Feature Releases – A news release can discuss a topic that is more than a day or two old and is of special interest. All public relations people can find feature material somewhere in their company – something going on in research and development, like a new production process. Such features can be prepared as ordinary news releases. An alternative, if the publication typically uses it, is a narrative style. The feature lends itself to a story telling approach. For television, it might even be used over several consecutive days.

Bad News Releases – There are times when something happens that the company would like to keep quiet. When the news is released it often involves the company’s regulatory agency. Regulatory agencies are supposed to act in the public’s interest, you can be sure the agency will release a report.

By: Brian Gottesman

Brian Gottesman is a Public Relations Executive with over 9 years of experience in public relations and publications. His work has been published in several network television, print and blog outlets including Fox News, CBS, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Buzz Feed and Mashable.

Simplifying the Complex

The need for clear and simple writing has never been greater. With email messages flashing through cyber space and faxes going around the globe, your prose will be translated and interpreted in many different cultures and experiences.

If you remember to write in simple language you will be able to write simply about the most complex ideas. This is important because the world has become exceedingly complex.

Public relations professionals are called upon to translate complex ideas into simple language. There Is nothing simple about many industries PR professionals work in. These industries include nuclear power, pollution chemistry or petroleum economics. Yet such issues are becoming more and more important to the average citizen. Public relations practitioners must be able to explain the implications of government or corporate interferences in these areas, as well as to interpret latest research findings in these industries. Public relations professionals usually use authorities to check the final drafts to be sure the translations are accurate.

There are many people who demand scientific explanations. If your company is building a chemical plant near a town, you better be able to explain to the people who live there what the plant will do and how its safety system will work.

Conflicting scientific advice also gets into the public agenda, leaving people confused about what to believe or do.

A solution for PR writers of health, disease and treatment issues is to use a system of getting a diversified panel of experts both internally and externally to develop a document called a position paper. Position papers then provide a launching pad for all public statements on an issue about a product, service or project.

And if the public doesn’t ask technical questions directly, newspaper reporters and electronic journalists will. Today, all media deal with more technical subjects in greater detail than ever before. When reporters, freelancers or bloggers working on such stories don’t understand something themselves, they often go to PR people for explanations.

 

By: Brian Gottesman

Brian Gottesman is a Public Relations Executive with over 9 years of experience in public relations and publications. His work has been published in several network television, print and blog outlets including Fox News, CBS, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Buzz Feed and Mashable.

Is the Job a Good Fit

Our core beliefs come from our personalized belief system. Our Personalized belief system is influenced by our family, friends, education and our faith. Our personalized belief system isn’t tested as much as in the work place.

The reason is that organizations, like individuals, develop around a core set of values. Often you can find these set of values on the mission statement or even a formal statement of values. In finding a place to work you will need to look at companies core set of values to see if there’s a fit. Companies also look for a “good fit” when hiring.

Even when there is a “good fit,” initially, situations change and so does your comfort in the workplace. One way to understand ethical responsibility is to look closely at the changes in personal and professional behavior.              

By: Brian Gottesman

Brian Gottesman is a Public Relations Executive with over 9 years of experience in public relations and publications. His work has been published in several network television, print and blog outlets including Fox News, CBS, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Buzz Feed and Mashable.

Social media regulation leads to issues

The nature of social media makes it difficult for public relations professionals to manage the medium. Certain sectors, such as finance and pharmaceuticals, are heavily regulated. Making it difficult for PR professionals to know what they should put online. Even third party posts on a company’s social media platforms can raise legal issues.

The federal regularity agencies that regulates industries monitor social media but are slow in giving guidance to many sectors on appropriate uses of social media. Companies can get stiff fines from these agencies. The financial and health sectors are heavily regulated and are very wary of social media. This frustrates public relations professionals and consumers.

According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 8 out of 10 internet users search for health information online. It’s very important the FDA makes timely and relevant guidelines for social media use to healthcare companies.

One of the challenges is knowing whether a consumers post on a company’s website or social media is considered company communication. This could be troubling. For instance, if a consumer posts a non-recommended use of a drug.

In the financial sector, FINRA recommends not posting anything about an investment unless approved by leadership of the firm.

By: Brian Gottesman

Brian Gottesman is a Public Relations Executive with over 9 years of experience in public relations and publications. His work has been published in several network television, print and blog outlets including Fox News, CBS, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Buzz Feed and Mashable.